Animals · Cats · Mountain Lion · Puma

Cat Country

cougar

The Cougar

This powerful predator roams the Americas, where it is also known as a puma, cougar, and catamount. This big cat of many names is also found in many habitats, from Florida swamps to Canadian forests.

Mountain lions like to prey on deer, though they also eat smaller animals such as coyotes, porcupines, and raccoons. They usually hunt at night or during the gloaming hours of dawn and dusk. These cats employ a blend of stealth and power, stalking their prey until an opportunity arrives to pounce, then going for the back of the neck with a fatal bite.

Type:MammalDiet:CarnivoreSize:Head and body, 3.25 to 5.25 ft (1 to 1.6 m); Tail, 23.5 to 33.5 in (60 to 85 cm)Weight:136 lbs (62 kg)Protection status:Endangered

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Animals · Birds · Fowl · Nature

The Majestic Peacock

peacock

The Peacock

Peacocks are large, colorful pheasants (typically blue and green) known for their iridescent tails. These tail feathers, or coverts, spread out in a distinctive train that is more than 60 percent of the bird’s total body length and boast colorful “eye” markings of blue, gold, red, and other hues. The large train is used in mating rituals and courtship displays. It can be arched into a magnificent fan that reaches across the bird’s back and touches the ground on either side. Females are believed to choose their mates according to the size, color, and quality of these outrageous feather trains.

The term “peacock” is commonly used to refer to birds of both sexes. Technically, only males are peacocks. Females are peahens, and together, they are called peafowl.

Animals

Monkeying Around!

tan monkey hanging out

Gibbon

Monkey Species
There are more than 260 species of Monkeys found in the world today. They are derived from early primates that have been around for millions of years. There isn’t enough information about evolution to say with certainty how they came to be.  The gibbon monkey — or, more properly, gibbon ape — might not have a familiar name, but you’ve probably seen his funny walk and graceful style of swinging through the trees. Gibbons are so closely related to humans that they live in monogamous families and can walk upright on two legs. These slender, agile primates live in a small part of the world and are on the endangered species list.