Animals · Sharks · water

Bamboo Sharks

DSCN2146Bamboo Sharks

Size: Up to 3.5 feet long
Habitat/Range: Shallow waters of tide pools and inshore coral reefs of the Indo-west Pacific region

A small shark with spots. Its dorsal fins are straight or convex rear margins, and its anal fin is set very far back on a very long, thick tail. Its first dorsal fin origin is opposite or just behind the pelvic fin insertions, and it has lateral ridges on its body.

COLOR
This shark has a pokie machines dark body with numerous light and dark spots, dark bands and saddles not conspicuously edged with black.

SIZE
When the shark hatches, it is about 3.54 to 4.72 inches [9 to 12 cm] in length. Females mature when they are 1.6 to 2 ft [50 to 60 cm], and the shark can reach a length of 3.1 ft [95 cm].

HABITAT
The shark prefers inshore waters. It is usually seen on the bottom, or on the reefs in the tropics.

DISTRIBUTION
Indo-west Pacific from Madagascar to Indonesia, the Philippines, and Japan.

(photos taken at Adventure Aquarium)

Advertisements
Birds · Nature · Photography

LAUGHING KOOKABURRA

LAUGHING KOOKABURRA

LAUGHING KOOKABURRA

The Laughing Kookaburra is instantly recognisable in both plumage and voice. It is generally off-white below, faintly barred with dark brown, and brown on the back and wings. The tail is more rufous, broadly barred with black. There is a conspicuous dark brown eye-stripe through the face. It is one of the larger members of the kingfisher family.

Similar species:

Identification may only be confused where the Laughing Kookaburra’s range overlaps that of the Blue-winged KookaburraDacelo leachii, in eastern Queensland. The call of the Blue-winged Kookaburra is coarser than that of the Laughing Kookaburra, and ends somewhat abruptly. The Blue-winged Kookaburra lacks the brown eye-stripe, has a blue tail and a large amount of blue in the wing, and has a pale eye.

Where does it live?

Distribution:

Laughing Kookaburras are found throughout eastern Australia. They have been introduced to Tasmania, the extreme south-west of Western Australia, and New Zealand. Replaced by the Blue-winged Kookaburra in central northern and north-western Australia, with some overlap in Queensland, although this species is more coastal.

Habitat:

The Laughing Kookaburra inhabits most areas where there are suitable trees.