Animals · Sharks · water

Bamboo Sharks

DSCN2146Bamboo Sharks

Size: Up to 3.5 feet long
Habitat/Range: Shallow waters of tide pools and inshore coral reefs of the Indo-west Pacific region

A small shark with spots. Its dorsal fins are straight or convex rear margins, and its anal fin is set very far back on a very long, thick tail. Its first dorsal fin origin is opposite or just behind the pelvic fin insertions, and it has lateral ridges on its body.

This shark has a pokie machines dark body with numerous light and dark spots, dark bands and saddles not conspicuously edged with black.

When the shark hatches, it is about 3.54 to 4.72 inches [9 to 12 cm] in length. Females mature when they are 1.6 to 2 ft [50 to 60 cm], and the shark can reach a length of 3.1 ft [95 cm].

The shark prefers inshore waters. It is usually seen on the bottom, or on the reefs in the tropics.

Indo-west Pacific from Madagascar to Indonesia, the Philippines, and Japan.

(photos taken at Adventure Aquarium)

Birds · Nature · Photography




The Laughing Kookaburra is instantly recognisable in both plumage and voice. It is generally off-white below, faintly barred with dark brown, and brown on the back and wings. The tail is more rufous, broadly barred with black. There is a conspicuous dark brown eye-stripe through the face. It is one of the larger members of the kingfisher family.

Similar species:

Identification may only be confused where the Laughing Kookaburra’s range overlaps that of the Blue-winged KookaburraDacelo leachii, in eastern Queensland. The call of the Blue-winged Kookaburra is coarser than that of the Laughing Kookaburra, and ends somewhat abruptly. The Blue-winged Kookaburra lacks the brown eye-stripe, has a blue tail and a large amount of blue in the wing, and has a pale eye.

Where does it live?


Laughing Kookaburras are found throughout eastern Australia. They have been introduced to Tasmania, the extreme south-west of Western Australia, and New Zealand. Replaced by the Blue-winged Kookaburra in central northern and north-western Australia, with some overlap in Queensland, although this species is more coastal.


The Laughing Kookaburra inhabits most areas where there are suitable trees.